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Weeknotes 001 - Not starting weeknotes

I am absolutely not starting weeknotes.

I'm not starting weeknotes because it turns out I pretty much hate writing. Writing takes me forever, writing blog posts is the worst because I use far too many words, and I agonise over every one, then I have to get rid of half of them to make the post a decent length.

I have written precisely zero blog posts in the whole of 2019.

The "Journal" section of the website was added to give me somewhere to write "quick" posts, which didn't have the perceived importance (to me) of the "proper" blogposts. I figured letting myself off that hook of things having to be proper would prompt me to write more.

I have written four journal posts in 2019.

Goodness knows why I think I'll be able to write weeknotes every fuckin' Friday.

Although I admit a lot of not writing was because having written my own blogging tool, I decided that the best thing to do was to promptly rewrite it. And to do so in just the right way that although it could display posts, I couldn't write any new posts, finally throwing in getting busy to put the nail in the coffin of doing anything blog related.

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Having decided to at least write one weeknote this evening, I then had an existential crisis about making a whole new section for weeknotes, or should I add them to the journal section.

I've opted for a whole new section, because why the hell not. So now I have three levels of writing; blog posts (hardly ever), journal posts (rarely), weeknotes (possibly weekly).

I am an idiot.

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And finally, I don't feel like I do anything that means I'll have anything to write. Other than, "Yup, did writing code today, mainly not understanding graphQL, and then understanding it, until I got to the next part I didn't understand". That works for pretty much each week.

However, I've just finished listening to "Storyworthy" a book about, well, telling stories. I'm not keen on the "Engage, Teach and Persuade" part of the tagline, nor the life-changing part to be honest. But in the book, Matthew Dicks talks about spotting things that happen throughout the day that could be considered storyworthy. He suggests that at the end of each day, try and think of one thing that happened that could be the seed of a story. Then put that into a spreadsheet.

Each day, every day.

Like an ultra-brief journal.

Then you can go back later and see which ones stand out as a potential tale. Perhaps that works for weeknotes too.

Ooooh, look. I posted a link to a book I've actually consumed, perhaps I can do these weeknote things after all.

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